decorative wave

Makino History: Part 2

A traditional German company in transition – how the Makino story began in Germany in the 1970s.

Historically speaking, Germany and Japan have been allies. In the 1970s, there were intensive cultural, scientific and economic exchanges. Especially in the West, the 1970s were considered to be a decade of crises, upheavals and changes. But it was precisely in this decade, in October 1978, that Makino went into business with Heidenreich & Harbeck GmbH in a capital venture.

A German company with a long lasting tradition

Hamburg-based Heidenreich & Harbeck was a company with a long German tradition. Founded back in 1868 its expertise was originally in the production of lathes.
A German company with a long lasting tradition

Local Production - made in Germany

Makino decided to produce its products locally in the Heidenreich & Harbeck premises. The first machine developed was the MC40, which was later developed into the MC50. In all, more than 500 machines were built. As the "local production” concept proved its worth, more machines were developed, e.g. the FNC166 and the MC86 1, 2 and 3. Later, the FMS system business was added to the portfolio. The largest single order in the history of Heidenreich & Harbeck was the sale of large FMS systems worth over €50 million to Bulgaria and Russia.
 

New name: Makino GmbH

The Hamburg headquarters was taken over by the Japanese Makino Group in 1978. In 1997 the "local business" was expanded and business units were created throughout Europe. In 1999 the company was renamed Makino GmbH.
 
New name: Makino GmbH

Globalisation

In 2000 a second location was established in Kirchheim unter Teck, near Stuttgart, in order to further expand the Tool and Mould Making division. This location is at the heart of the Stuttgart Metropolitan Region, which is well known as the European competence centre for mechanical engineering and where world-leading tool and mould-making products are manufactured.
In the 2010s the aerospace sector demanded more and more projects from Makino and the Aerospace Technology Centre was set up. This brought people from different European countries together in Kirchheim.
By 2015, the facilities where aerospace machines were housed along with the most accurate die and mould machines proved to be too small. So Makino expanded with a new showroom of over 1,000 sqm and enlarged the administrative building to house a growing number of corporate functions.
As Makino grew in Kirchheim, the headquarters also moved from Hamburg in 2018.
 
Globalisation